Finished my first 10K, what next?

OWnewbieOWnewbie United StatesNew Member

Hiya, newbie here. I am in awe and inspired by the swimmers on these forums. Tried searching old forums for answers, but couldn't find my answers, so here goes...

Finished my first 10K recently and felt pretty darn good. Was training consistently about 25K a week leading up to it. What is a realistic next event goal? 20K, 25K, or even a solo swim? How many 10K swims did I need before taking that next jump into longer swims?

Also, in my early 40's. too late for me to wish for those epic solo swims later on?

Thanks!

Comments

  • ruthruth New Jersey, USAMember
    edited September 2023

    After a 10k, I did an 8 mile (12.something k) swim, though this step probably isn't necessary, but it was convenient. Then a 10 mile (16k), then 15 mile (25k) then 20 mile (32k) solo channel crossing. Your progression may vary but this was mine. I did a 10k at the end of my first OW season (though with a strong general swimming background), and a 10 mile at the end of my second.

    Most race directors want you to have done something in the neighborhood of 2/3 to 3/4 the race distance in a single swim (not necessarily official, I have sent off Garmin tracks from informal swims) before allowing you to register for a longer event.

    Also, in my early 40's. too late for me to wish for those epic solo swims later on?

    Nah, you can swim til your shoulders fall off.

  • abeabe australiaMember

    hi newbie i have done a few 10kms then a 15km and going for the 42km in 6 months and im 50
    GO BIG OR GO HOME all the best

  • KatieBunKatieBun CornwallSenior Member

    Hi Newbie. I went from 10k to 21miles, in my 50s. As long as your stroke won't cause you any injury and you train sensibly, you can go for any swim you want. Age is just a label. Enjoy yourself.

    LakeBaggerIronMikerastakuere
  • j9swimj9swim CharlestonSenior Member

    its NEVER too late to swim your dreams and I'm living proof of that! I was not a swimteam kid nor an athlete. I swam my first mile at 47, my 1st 10k at 49, at 54 I swam around Manhattan, and at 60 I swam the length of Lake Tahoe. If you love doing it and train approximately you can swim most anything. So find water that speaks to you, friends to swim with and dream big!

    Openh2orastakuere
  • @KatieBun makes an important point. If you want to swim high volumes and build longer distances, injury avoidance/prevention is helpful. As well as ensuring that your stroke is well adapted to endurance swimming, you may also find it helpful to find a routine of "prehab" exercises particularly for maintaining shoulder health and flexibility. Have fun with your swimming adventures!

    KatieBunLakeBagger
  • KatieBunKatieBun CornwallSenior Member

    @swimfreeordie said:
    @KatieBun makes an important point. If you want to swim high volumes and build longer distances, injury avoidance/prevention is helpful. As well as ensuring that your stroke is well adapted to endurance swimming, you may also find it helpful to find a routine of "prehab" exercises particularly for maintaining shoulder health and flexibility. Have fun with your swimming adventures!

    Video analysis is always a good idea at this stage. Prevention is always a better option. I'm with you on the prehab exercises, @swimfreeordie !

  • LakeBaggerLakeBagger Central OregonSenior Member

    @OWnewbie Great job on your 10k and the training leading up to it. A consistent 25k/week is actually really good compared with a lot of people I have talked with. If you feel good at that volume, you're likely ready for a 25k swim. And if you up your weekly volume by a tad (like to 30k/week), you'll probably finish your 25k feeling really good (barring unforeseen circumstances). Then your confidence will be up to try something even longer!

    Extra note: maybe try something around 25k in similar conditions (temp, wind etc) as your 10k... And maybe try a 10k in harder conditions than your first 10k (like colder or rougher water).

    In hearing about people's EC and Catalina attempts, it seems like the training volume is rarely where people fall short. Usually, it's people aren't used to swimming in big choppy water, or they didn't realize they get sea sickness at night or it's too many new factors coupled with a distance they haven't done before. I think it's best to gradually introduce yourself to new challenges/conditions on distances you're already comfortable with, while increasing your distance swims in conditions you've gotten used to.

    Absolutely you are not too old to shoot for some epic swims. The main thing is having the desire and time to swim consistently, an adventurous spirit... and patience (plus prehab exercises!) to avoid injury.

    Openh2ocurlyjendutIronMikemarysinger
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