DIY Question: Feeding Rope

KatieKatie Charlotte, NCMember

My self-designated weekend project is to make my feeding rope to start practicing feeds with in anticipation of a Catalina attempt in August. For those who have gone before me in this project- approximately how long of a rope will I need? How did you secure your bottles/ gels/ food to the rope without the rope coming off (I've seen folks use duct tape to secure)? Tips, tricks and considerations welcome!
I'm sure the dudes at Lowes are going to find this quite entertaining when I go to buy the darned rope......

Comments

  • kejoycekejoyce Member

    i crewed for @slknight using the leash and i can confirm that the dog leash tactic is awesome for crew, too. Sometimes with salt water over a number of hours it gets a little sluggish to retract, but it's still better (imo) than a wet piece of rope.

    KatieKari33
  • slknightslknight Member

    I do like to bring an extra in case the first one gets jammed up or something. You actually don't even need to buy a retractable one if you don't want. Buy a regular dog leash instead of rope because the leash will already have a hook/latch on one end.

    Katie
  • KatieKatie Charlotte, NCMember

    I'm giggling over here at the craftiness of open water swimmers. Thinking we should have a Pinterest page or something....
    Thanks for the idea!

    BridgetKari33
  • MLambyMLamby Member

    I use a neoprene sleeve attached with a heavy plastic clip to an eight foot nylon lanyard. It will fit a twenty ounce Gatorade sized bottle easily. Water proof, light, and pretty much tangle proof.

    1. The rougher the swim, the longer the rope. Have extra available for your crew to add on if needed.
    2. Carabiners
      My line has now lasted me over three full years (my whole marathon swimming career thus far!)
    kejoyceAlex_ArevaloKari33
  • KatieKatie Charlotte, NCMember

    Love the suggestions. Bought myself a 30ft dog lead last night. Figure if this doesn't quite work out my daughter can put it to use training our dog. Woof.

    slknightthelittlemerwookieBridgetKatieBunKari33
  • swimrn62swimrn62 Stowe, VTMember

    I try to avoid things that can break. My choice, whether kayaking or crewing, is a tow line that I already own:

    https://northwater.com/collections/tow-lines-throw-lines/products/sea-tec-tow-line

    The line can be adjusted to any length, and if crewing, there's always somewhere on the boat
    to secure the belt and it's quick release if necessary. There is at least one model with rope that goes up to 50'. I don't mind wet rope but I do always carry fingerless gloves, also made for paddlers, to avoid blisters that can happen over time.

    Katie
  • ColmBreathnachColmBreathnach Charter Member

    Something like this with a carabiner on the end. They call them plumbers reels over here.
    https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/Stringliner-by-U-S-Tape-5908116-500-ft-Braided-Line-Fl-44-Yellow-Black/PRD2IHH8NI2IF4G

    use an old milk container for the drink
    https://www.tesco.ie/groceries/Product/Details/?id=254628272

    clip the carabiner onto the carrying handle. put a small hole in the lid and tie it on to the carton with a piece of string.

    30ft sounds like a lot, but it's a bit short if it's any way choppy and/or the boat keeps moving. You dont want your precious feed being yanked out your mouth ;-)

    KatieIronMike
  • flystormsflystorms Memphis, TNMember

    I used about a 10' piece of surgical rubber tubing, attached caribeeners to each end. Hooked one end to the kayak and the other to whatever bottle was being tossed out. For bottles without loops on them, I found the Velcro wire ties and looped them around the neck of those bottles. The whole setup worked great!

    KatieKate_Alexander
  • IronMikeIronMike BostonCharter Member

    I use twine. Seriously. 12' approximately. Tied on one end to my Rubbermaid bottle and the other end looped around my kayaker's or crew's wrist.

    KatieBridget

    Just here troubling deaf heaven with my bootless cries...

  • KatieKatie Charlotte, NCMember

    @ColmBreathnach said:
    30ft sounds like a lot, but it's a bit short if it's any way choppy and/or the boat keeps moving. You dont want your precious feed being yanked out your mouth ;-)

    Well, it could make you swim faster to try and keep up with your food! :)

    AnthonyMcCarley
  • AnthonyMcCarleyAnthonyMcCarley Berwyn, PACharter Member
    edited May 16


    My experiences are that dog leashes aren't long enough for many swims - because of conditions or boat size. And often 30 feet of regular line isn't enough either.

    evmoKate_AlexanderKatie
  • AnthonyMcCarleyAnthonyMcCarley Berwyn, PACharter Member

    Also, for night swims, as well as attaching a road-id light, we use glow-in-the-dark duct tape (to hold the GU on) and rope.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005I4MGXM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Kate_AlexanderKatieflystorms
  • slknightslknight Member
    edited May 16

    @AnthonyMcCarley said:

    My experiences are that dog leashes aren't long enough for many swims - because of conditions or boat size. And often 30 feet of regular line isn't enough either.

    Regular dog leashes; no. Of course not. But dog leads go up to at least 50 feet and they prevent you from having to add a carabiner because they are already on. https://www.chewy.com/mendota-products-trainer-check-cord/dp/144800

    AnthonyMcCarleyKari33
  • AnthonyMcCarleyAnthonyMcCarley Berwyn, PACharter Member
    edited May 17

    @slknight said: But dog leads go up to at least 50 feet...

    Wow, didn't know that. Learned something new... which is what the Forum is about.

    (Still like glow-in-the-dark stuff.)

    slknight
  • slknightslknight Member

    @AnthonyMcCarley said:

    @slknight said: But dog leads go up to at least 50 feet...

    (Still like glow-in-the-dark stuff.)

    I'm going to order some of that glow-in-the-dark tape. Looks awesome!

    AnthonyMcCarleyKatie
  • KatieKatie Charlotte, NCMember
    edited May 20

    @AnthonyMcCarley, thanks for sharing a picture of the system you've rigged up there. I'm actually really intrigued, and am liking, your idea of integrating a buoy into the system. My pull buoy is one of the older 2-piece kinds and I'm now seeing some merits to using carabiners to attach water bottles, snacks, etc. so they don't sink. This board is awesome generating all kinds of ideas!

  • AnthonyMcCarleyAnthonyMcCarley Berwyn, PACharter Member

    Katie,
    Glad you like it. Not sure the photo shows it well... But before the swim starts, there are four GU packets duct taped to each of the water bottles. That way there is less need for talking - if I want a GU, I take it. I shove the wrapper in the the back of my suit. And the Observer and team know I took a GU when they pull the bottle back in and a packet is gone. Cuts down lots of work and communication. The carabiners allow for them to switch easily between carbo pro and straight water - depending on my frail stomach. The buoy works because it keeps the water bottle closer to the surface when it hits the water and the buoy is easier to spot when in rough waters and at night. (Also, at night, a light get attached to the buoy.)

    KatieKate_Alexanderflystorms
  • MLambyMLamby Member

    Speaking of DIY fixes, I have saved money by using a tiny amount of 99 cents a bottle baby shampoo and water to replace spit spray. (I mix it in my Spit Spray bottle) :) You could make a single bottle of baby shampoo last....I don't even know because I haven't run out. :) Make sure you're not allergic first!

    Kari33
  • ChefKenChefKen Charleston, SCMember

    I have an 'extra small' dog collar (like for a chihuahua) that I use around my bottles that a caribiner clips to with a nice long cord. The dog collar makes it easy to take on and off the various bottles I use (that are all identical), but also be nice and tight so that it won't slip off.

    Sara_WolfKatie

    Ken Immer
    www.culinaryhealthsolutions.com
    IG: @siopswimtraining

  • IronMikeIronMike BostonCharter Member

    @IronMike said:
    I use twine. Seriously. 12' approximately. Tied on one end to my Rubbermaid bottle and the other end looped around my kayaker's or crew's wrist.

    I've been informed by my wife, first-time kayak support after Saturday's 10k, that I'm stupid to use twine. Got wet and nasty and was too small. Yesterday she bought me some legit nylon paracord for our next endeavor, whenever that might be.

    SoloKatie

    Just here troubling deaf heaven with my bootless cries...

  • KatieKatie Charlotte, NCMember

    @IronMike said:

    @IronMike said:
    I use twine. Seriously. 12' approximately. Tied on one end to my Rubbermaid bottle and the other end looped around my kayaker's or crew's wrist.

    I've been informed by my wife, first-time kayak support after Saturday's 10k, that I'm stupid to use twine. Got wet and nasty and was too small. Yesterday she bought me some legit nylon paracord for our next endeavor, whenever that might be.

    I like your wife. ;)

    IronMike
  • @IronMike said:

    @IronMike said:
    I use twine. Seriously. 12' approximately. Tied on one end to my Rubbermaid bottle and the other end looped around my kayaker's or crew's wrist.

    I've been informed by my wife, first-time kayak support after Saturday's 10k, that I'm stupid to use twine. Got wet and nasty and was too small. Yesterday she bought me some legit nylon paracord for our next endeavor, whenever that might be.

    I use a retractable dog leash.... for heavier dogs (wider tape) and a LONG length. It won't work in all conditions, but for what I'm doing, it's super easy. Also, the super small cat/tiny dog collars around the bottles.... and separate carbiners to attach between leash and bottles. Presto! Easy - Peasy.

    I do fully extend the leash when I get home from the lake, though...and drape it to thoroughly dry. Worried about having that much wetness inside the canister for some reason.

    Agree with your wife, too..... twine... ick.

    IronMikeKatie
  • MoCoMoCo Worcester, MAMember

    @Sara_Wolf said:
    I do fully extend the leash when I get home from the lake, though...and drape it to thoroughly dry. Worried about having that much wetness inside the canister for some reason.

    Based on what happened to our dog's old extendable leash when it got wet in a heavy downpour and we didn't dry it, yeah, you're smart. It stunk of mold. (and we only use an extendable for potty breaks in our unfenced yard - they're actually really unsafe for dog walking.). If you do use extendables, have your kayakers be careful reeling them in. Some of them come in fast.

  • @MoCo said:

    @Sara_Wolf said:
    I do fully extend the leash when I get home from the lake, though...and drape it to thoroughly dry. Worried about having that much wetness inside the canister for some reason.

    Based on what happened to our dog's old extendable leash when it got wet in a heavy downpour and we didn't dry it, yeah, you're smart. It stunk of mold. (and we only use an extendable for potty breaks in our unfenced yard - they're actually really unsafe for dog walking.). If you do use extendables, have your kayakers be careful reeling them in. Some of them come in fast.

    Yep.....all of that.
    And.......make sure only enough needed to get to me is reeled out.....because I can get tangled in it. :smile:
    Not that I know that from experience, or anything.

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