Weekly training volume for completing marathon swims?

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Comments

  • DannyDanny Member

    Never thought of practicing getting in and out of water from the boat but a good idea. Plus you add night swimming and things get interesting. Do you have any ideas on using lights at night? We plan on glow sticks but open to suggestions.

    IronMike
  • IronMikeIronMike Northern VirginiaCharter Member

    OMG, one hour on/five off? Horrible. Have you thought about doing 30 min chunks? Could go nice and fast for 30 min instead of 60. Waiting in the boat for your turn is mind-numbing.

    Second the advice to learn how to swim straight. Was on a relay once and one of our team members would jump in, high-five the person they were replacing, then start swimming. Every time wrong direction. ;)

    flystorms

    We're all just carbon, water, starlight, oxygen and dreams

  • swimmer25kswimmer25k Charter Member

    j9swim said:
    @glenn - technically its 10k or greater. For the last 3 years i've been training for swims from 15k to 35k. but i calculate this more about my expected time to complete than the actual distance .

    I have to disagree with you a little. 10K is the Olympic made for TV/spectators distance. The old World Championship distance was 25K and a 5K was added at the 1998 Worlds in Australia. Old school extreme is the way to go. Racing a 25K is a totally different paradigm than a 10K.

    To get back on track; train as much as you can and make the most of the time you have. I liked to do most of my training in the pool and a weekend open water workout. As swims got longer; I got better (5K: bad, 10K: OK, 25K: good, and 37K+: hard to beat). However, I rarely went over three hours in an open water workout. For me, open water workouts were for the feel of the environment whereas the pool was for fitness. I had a hard time recovering after a long ocean swim and didn't feel much difference between a 15K training swim and a 42K up Tampa Bay.

    Solo
  • curlycurly Issaquah, WASenior Member

    swimmer25k said:
    ... For me, open water workouts were for the feel of the environment whereas the pool was for fitness...

    That's a really interesting observation. One thing I've been puzzling over is how to create open water workouts that are more like pool workouts with sets and pace clock motivating the swimming. Last summer, I really noticed that once I was out of the pool and into the lake, I would lock on to my all day pace and that's what I'd do for my swim. In the pool, I vary pace and effort, so I get a much stronger workout in.

    I'm trying to figure a way to work with my lovely kayaker to develop some open water workouts that approximate sets and timing. I have a pretty good sense of pacing, i.e. I know what a 1:30 100 feels like compared to a 1:20 for example. So I'm thinking maybe my kayaker signals the start and finish of a 5:00 interval and I swim at a quick pace for that, then back it down for a rest interval, then she signals the next start and finish. This could lead to a pretty strong open water workout... or divorce.

  • swimmer25kswimmer25k Charter Member

    It's tough to make an open water workout like one in the pool. Here are a few examples of how I broke OW down. One each by distance (swimming alone) and time.

    When I lived in South Florida my OW training was done off of Ft Lauderdale Beach starting at the Hall of Fame. The course I usually swam was about 8-9K as an out and back. There were several landmarks along the beach I used as waypoints in my workout. The first 1.5 miles (to the Holiday Inn) was a warm up. From there to just past Oakland Park Blvd was a build to about 85% effort and stop once across from a traffic light. On the way back I would build back to the Holiday Inn, hammer to the Elbo Room bar, and coast the rest of the way in. This was about a two hour swim for me. I didn't swim with a watch and never concerned myself with time. All that mattered to me was covering the distance. Time only matters in the pool and when approaching a black hole.

    I would mix things up when I had a kayaker and swim off of a watch (I did lots of point to point swims with a kayaker as a guide and works break those swims down in a similar way when I lived in Dallas).

    Here's a typical three hour workout with a kayaker:
    45 minutes easy followed by 45 minutes build to a solid effort. I feed every 15 minutes on the fly. (My English Channel video shows how I feed here around the 18 minute mark. On a side note I only have 470 visits; most of which are my mom. Someone even gave me a thumbs down. WTF?)

    After the first 90 mins I stop for a break and begin to head home. I liked to do 6X 12 minute pulls descending 1 to 3 twice through. The rest of the swim was easy until I made it back to where I started.

    Chris

    LakeBaggercurlybahsan22
  • curlycurly Issaquah, WASenior Member

    @swimmer25k I like the idea of using landmarks to mark points for different effort levels. I have a couple routes that I like to swim regularly and already have a bunch of landmarks that I use for reference. So it will be easy for me to designate starting points for changes in effort etc. The hard part will be telling myself to turn up the heat knowing that the next landmark is quite a ways away. This is very helpful, thanks.

  • Copelj26Copelj26 ChicagoSenior Member

    I hit the targets I had set myself in earlier posts, but been finding it very hard to stay motivated this year. I picked up mileage as I suggested I would in April and May, covering just over 100 miles in April and just under 70 miles in May (lower as I had to go to Brazil for work for a week as part of a new job role) and with a total of just over 500 miles over past 12 months. Hoping I find the motivation in the next 2 weeks in the run up to End Wet but worried something is just lacking this year, versus swimming in to Canada as part of Border Buster, I found excited me. Looking forward to being done with this event and just swimming when and where I want over next few months. This attitude also has me a little worried. Anyway we shall see if this years mileage plan has me covered

    SoloSydneD
  • Chris- I watched your youtube video so it has another visit- your are up to 488 :-) You musical choices get a 10/10 from me- perhaps the thumbs down was just not a motley crue fan?!

    I reread some of this thread and it always helps to chat about training, especially for me since I am learning on the fly what seems to work and what burns me out.

    My first 10k i trained ok with but it took a while to recover from the race, last year my second go- I over trained and managed to hurt myself in the process, I was able to work through it and race the event, but it hurt.

    Maybe this year i will find the right fit- but a mix of pool speed and endurance work with as many open water swims as i can fit in seems to keep boredom at bay.

  • glennglenn cape town SAMember

    I did my first 10km 2.5 weeks ago and it was a disaster. Bad nutrition etc and I had to be taken out. That's another story.

    But I feel like my body still hasn't recovered from the effort even now. I'm struggling to swim like I was before. My motivation is also low and I've been a bit sick but I feel like that swim has just knocked me for a 6. Going to push through until the end of next week and then I have a forced 3 week break to hopefully rest the body and the mind. Then I'll sit down again and decide what my plan of action will be

  • KatieBunKatieBun CornwallSenior Member

    @glenn if you feel so dreadful, still, do you need to push through until the end of next week? Maybe you should start resting.

    Jaimie
  • glennglenn cape town SAMember

    possibly but that would be a month off and seems to much. Might just do some short easy swims

  • LynneLynne Member

    @glenn Lighthouse is a tough swim. You chose a difficult swim to be your first 10km, don't beat yourself up

    KatieBun
  • SoloSolo B.C. CanadaSenior Member

    glenn said:
    possibly but that would be a month off and seems to much. Might just do some short easy swims

    @glenn, do what you like to do, find your passion and pursue that! Pushing through might just lead to burnout or injury, and recovery from those could take a lot longer and spoil the joy of swimming.

    swimrn62
  • glennglenn cape town SAMember

    Thanks Lynne and solo. Had a really nice swim this morning. Serious lack of motivation to get out of bed and almost didn't swim. But once in the pool I really felt good. Not worried about injury much as I'm taking it easy and careful on proper stroke etc.

    Solo
  • curlycurly Issaquah, WASenior Member

    @glenn Look at it this way. You trained up for a big swim which took a lot of work. You attempted the big swim which took a lot of work. Your brain and body are naturally now asking for a well deserved vacation. Don't worry about the lack of motivation. Swim when you feel like it. Do some mellow enjoyable sets. Don't look at the clock or measure your distance. After a nice little vacation, you will start to get motivated and then you will go after your next challenge. Could take a few days or weeks or months. It doesn't really matter. Everything on earth goes in cycles of productivity and repose. One of the key aspects of water based sports is to "go with the flow, man...." (Said in the voice of the sea turtle in Finding Nemo...)

    flystormsStephen
  • glennglenn cape town SAMember

    thanks curly

  • suziedodssuziedods Mem​ber

    This is NOT advice..
    I finished ( UNDER the time limit:)) Mercer Island.. 20K And I am darn sure that it was 20K because my pilot was fantabulous, on the following "training".. Two 5K pool swims, one 8 pool swim , on 2 Hour bay swim and one 3 hour Bay swim.
    Mind you.. there was CONSISTENT swimming about 4 days a week but my WEEKLY total never got above 10K.
    I DO NOT recommend this avenue but it is possible.Conditions were favorable, water temp was a perfect 64F .
    Just saying..

    IronMikethelittlemerwookieJSwimmina
  • I feel Dead volume dose not count. Have a pace and target in mind work towards this not aiming for a high volume of work.

  • JSwimJSwim western Maryland, USSenior Member

    Anthony McCarley @AnthonyMcCarley, gave me some very excellent training advice at the end of last year, when I (rather naively) signed up for all the Stages of 8 Bridges:

    "The only thing that matters is you having the ability to keep swimming.”

    “In my opinion, it doesn't matter how many times a week you swim. What matters is the distance per workout.” (Any seasoned marathon swimmer) “can do 5,000 meters a day seven days straight. But for what you are training for - what matters is can you do 10,000 or more meters in a single swim a couple times a week?"

    For some background, I'm 54F, middle of the pack generally, for speed (:30/mile or so forever pace), swam competitively as a kid, got back into swimming in 2011, first marathon swim in 2014. My longest swim before 8 Bridges was Pittsburgh 3 Rivers 30 km in September in 10:06.

    How did 8 Bridges go? I attempted all the Stages, finishing all but Stage 2 (was stopped at 8:33). My longest was Stage 5 at 10:41. Even though I felt really beat and sore at the end of most swims, by morning, I was okay. (Mental fatigue was more an issue than physical fatigue by the end of the week.) The day after 3RMS I was NOT okay to swim long again. It would have been ugly a week or more out.

    So n=2. I agree 100% with Anthony that two 3-4+ hour swims per week is very very different than spreading that swimming over 6 or 7 days. I wasn't perfect in training this way. Before I could get outside there were days I couldn't face swimming in a hot pool for 3 hours. Traveling interfered early in the spring and then there was a family crisis in the latter half of May so I swam once in 2+ weeks. I almost backed out of 8 Bridges. I started back with 2 long swims / week when I could, and considered my break an early taper.

    (I should add that January – April I was also swimming three 75 minute morning Masters practices per week of about 3000 m per workout.)

    This is not 10 km or beginner marathon swimming advice. I could not have trained this way until maybe a year ago. My shoulders wouldn't have taken it, nor was I ready mentally. Now that I've done it, besides the fact that it worked, it felt like I was swimming a lot less because it was in big blocks.

    evmoSoloAnthonyMcCarleywendyv34KatieBunLakeBaggerIronMikeminagrappledunkmiklcct

    Life begins at the end of your comfort zone. --Neale Donald Walsch

  • LakeBaggerLakeBagger Central OregonSenior Member

    JSwim said
    So n=2. I agree 100% with Anthony that two 3-4+ hour swims per week is very very different than spreading that swimming over 6 or 7 days.

    I also agree--when training for END WET, I put my two longest days next to each other weekly. I went a 10k workout every Friday and a long workout every Saturday that built up to 4-6 hours. (14k-20k). My weekly average was 45k, so my other workouts were all around 5k. This worked for me because I wasn't trying to improve my speed so much as I was trying to improve my "distance tolerance". I had an enjoyable experience on the day of the event, finished feeling good and felt fine the next day.

    I benefited a lot from reading this thread when planning my training so I hope this helps someone out there! More details in this blog post:

    https://oregonlakebagging.wordpress.com/2018/06/12/preparing-for-end-wet/

    JSwimflystormsCopelj26j9swim
  • miklcctmiklcct London, United KingdomMem​ber

    @evmo said:
    The two most common rules of thumb (and I think they're pretty good ones) are:

    1. Weekly training volume should be (at least) equal to your target swim distance, for at least several months.

    2. At least one training swim of 65-75% of your target distance.

    @loneswimmer said:
    For an English Channel/Catalina swim (40k+), there seems a reasonable, but FAR from universal, thought that 40 to 45k per week is required from the start of the relevant calender year.

    This should be on top of plenty of swimming experience leading into it and a gradual buildup to the load also. I'm sure/hope there will be more thoughts and perspectives on this.

    I once read an old endurance runner's rule of thumb, you can run four times your maximum training distance for a one-off event (but not if you want to repeat the event).

    Another one guide is you can swim in a day what you train in a week.

    Thank you all for your guidance here. These two posts had led me well in my previous marathon swims that I completed them with satisfactory results.

    However, I'm now really worried about my EC swim coming in September, which I only have two months left.

    According to the above theories, I should aim for 30+ km per week since last December, building up to 40-50 km in the year over the winter. However, the extended closure order wiped out the whole pool swimming season (December to March) and my mental health at that moment was so bad that I stopped channel training for about two months after my 16 km swim. As a result I only swam about 24 km / week using methods suitable for races instead of channel swims, specifically no long swims at all and loads of sprinting.

    I hoped that I would have enough time to catch up after I emigrated to the UK late April, but I overestimated my ability handling cold water, and, my average swimming amount dropped to 15 km / week in that month (all in cold water) instead of building up from 24 km / week (16-20°C) before coming to the UK, probably resulting me losing loads of fitness in that month.

    Then, once the sea temperature reached 16°C, I tried to swim as much as I could but my body started to show symptoms when my mileage reached 25 km / week again, including lack of appetite, bad mood, and skipping planned sessions, and the worst happened was that, I got myself beach ready, walked there (a 10-minute walk from my home), and got back home dry after seeing the force 4 condition that I now saw rough water was daunting rather than fun.

    However, the expert advice I got all says I am still on target for a September swim, and they think 25-30 km / week training is enough (while swimming 40 km week by week WILL burn me out), and a long rehearsal swim of 2/3 of target distance does not have much meaning. And I should focus on the weekend back to backs, building up to 7 hours on a Saturday and 6 hours on a Sunday, i.e. 13 hours in total twice before my channel swim. They also think that long lake swims do not help preparing for the channel (therefore I'm skipping all the BLDSA races this year).

    I have a problem which I worry is that, in all my longer training swims, my speed always drop a lot over hours despite I start much slower than race speed, e.g. starting at about 2.3-2.4 km/h and ending up at just 1.7 km/h in the 6th hour, while my race speed is about 2.4 km/h on average over 6 hours. For example, for a 4-hour training swim, I can only cover about 9 km in distance, but for a race, completing 10 km in 4 km is realistic. And I worry ending up like "The Novice Triathlete" (Stuart Handley), missed the tide turn and washed away by the tide. They just tell me don't compare with him.

    Now I only have 2 months left. I still haven't reached the distance in any week, my speed drop is worrying, and the imagination of reaching France is now unfathomable when I know that, after 8 hours, my back will be destroyed, I will no longer have any power in my stroke, my speed will have dropped 40%, and I will still be only in the separation zone (while, in my original imagination of a channel swim is that, I should be enjoying the sunshine swimming gracefully at a steady speed in a romantic scene).

    Any thought here? Am I really on track for September or they are giving me a poison pill luring me to start my channel swim undertrained?

  • BogdanZBogdanZ Bucharest, RomaniaSenior Member

    "Race" pace is irrelevant, what matters is if you have enough gas in the tank when the swim requires.
    What race at 2.4 kmh?

    So you are hurting at 25km/week, they ("expert advice") advice you to swim max 25-30kms and you comment something about 40kms that neither you swim, nor they have advised.

    Being on track? I think you need to identify your weak points and treat them.
    If it's your confidence in your training and yourself, put your mind in training first, before going more than 25kms per week if that's were you get hurt, and handle the negative thinking.
    I am sure 100k per month is more than enough to get you from body fitness ready -perspective; to the finish.

    I have seen some of your cold trainings on Facebook and I am pretty sure the cold, the speed are not your weakest points.

    If you have trust issues in the advice received, why wasting time on writing monologues on how variable is the input you receive and how the expert advice is different than other feedbacks (25-30 vs 40s).
    My two cents, search for an expert advice that you take responsibility to listen to, without comments and without second thought. Swallow with zero comments all the advice and do the swim.

    If you train as much as you like to write, you will finish the EC swim.

    PS: why monologues? because I think it's almost one year since I read the stories and I just hope the swim slot comes soon (very soon), that I no longer read someone asking advice and then commenting on how maybe insufficient that is, or "it's not for me". At one pct. I think even the legend ST offered to help.

    PS2: so (stop being a blogger and) just keep swimming

    flystormsOpenh2oevmo
  • BogdanZBogdanZ Bucharest, RomaniaSenior Member

    And "Weekly training volume for completing marathon swims?" is not a title for Weekly training volume for EC.
    A marathon swim is something bigger than 10k, not the EC animal. Maybe another post should be created for ultraswims and "how to prepare for swims where you (like to) suffer".

    Openh2omiklcct
  • LakeBaggerLakeBagger Central OregonSenior Member

    My favorite physiologist/podcaster/coach published some rough guidelines for weekly mileage minimums to prepare for ultramarathon runs on his website. Based on the idea that a 10k swim is similar to a marathon run (42k), I converted his recommendation for 50k (30 miles), 50 mile and 100 mile runs to 7.5 mile, 12.5 mile and 25 mile swims (by dividing his recommendations by 4) Here's what I got:

    Swim Length: 7.5 miles, To finish: do 7.5 miles/week, To perform well: at least 12.5/week consistently, for 3 weeks before tapering.

    Swim Length: 12.5 miles, To finish: 10 miles/week, To perform well: at least 15 miles/week, consistently for 5 weeks before tapering

    Swim Length: 25 miles, To finish: 12.5 miles/week, To perform well: at least 17.5 miles/week for 6 weeks before taper.

    Swimming is different than running in a million ways, but I think it's interesting that according to this coach's model, as the target swim/run length increases, the recommended amount of swimming per week is a smaller percentage of the target swim than at shorter distances.

    I've always followed the rule of thumb @evmo mentioned above of doing the distance of the swim weekly for a few months before tapering. It's served me well. That being said, I know people who do a lot less (including one person who does 20+ mile swims on 10 minutes of swimming a few times a week). So I would say, you don't know what you can do on what training until you try. One thing's for sure, doing a swim when underprepared is going to hurt a lot more than one you were able to prepare well for.

    BogdanZmiklcctKate_Alexanderwendyv34evmoAngieSwims
  • brunobruno Barcelona (Spain)Senior Member

    So far, my swims are 10 to 20 km. As training, I try to swim on average 20 km/week from February to June. It has served me well.

    Personal, therefore anecdotal data regarding this summer 2021: due to several reasons, in April and May I could only average 6/7 km per week. Having signed for a 15 km and a 20 km swims for July, I decided to carry on and used my poor training as an experiment: how far can I swim if undertrained? I averaged 15 km/week in June.

    The 15 km swim was on the 3rd-July. I was expecting a 4h-45min time, but it took me 5h-33min. And I suffered a lot more than expected, too (both physically and mentally). The extra time was only due to my poor training (it was on a lake: no waves, no wind, no currents... Only I was towing a tow-float with 2 bottles for feedings). The following week I swam 31 km downstream a river (it's equivalent to a flat 20 km); conditions were rough (a lot of head wind and chop, slightly less current than previous years), but my performance was similar to that of 3 years ago on the same swim. I finished too tired, though.

    2 weeks later I swam a 7 km swim. My performance was similar to that of the last 3 years on the same swim, but I felt much more tired during the swim, and it took me huge efforts not to stop at about 3/4 of the race.

    The 3 swims were in 25ºC water. I'm pretty sure that, should it had been 17/18 ºC, I'd have quit.

    My conclusion is that I can swim up to 20 km with such a poor training, performing acceptably; but with too much suffering during the swim, therefore risking a DNF. For more than 6/7 hours swims, I need more training. I'll stick to the do the distance of the swim weekly for a few months rule from now on.

    Openh2oLakeBaggerbahsan22
  • miklcctmiklcct London, United KingdomMem​ber

    @BogdanZ said:
    A marathon swim is something bigger than 10k, not the EC animal. Maybe another post should be created for ultraswims and "how to prepare for swims where you (like to) suffer".

    @LakeBagger said:

    I've always followed the rule of thumb @evmo mentioned above of doing the distance of the swim weekly for a few months before tapering. It's served me well. That being said, I know people who do a lot less (including one person who does 20+ mile swims on 10 minutes of swimming a few times a week). So I would say, you don't know what you can do on what training until you try. One thing's for sure, doing a swim when underprepared is going to hurt a lot more than one you were able to prepare well for.

    Thanks for your explanation. Now I understand what's happening.

    I originally planned my training to swim well according to @evmo rule of thumb but the pandemic messed up my training. Now I'm still on track is to still complete my EC swim, but I think that in this case the day out will be a suffering rather than a romantic trip out on the sea to be enjoyed. This was not my original intention to swim the Channel (I wanted it to be fun and enjoy it, rather than suffer it).

    I can now only hope that I won't pick up an injury WHILE swimming the Channel to continue my swimming career (my goal is to become a high level competitive marathon swimmer at regional level under FINA rules).

  • BogdanZBogdanZ Bucharest, RomaniaSenior Member

    the idea is to listen to your body, there's no training solution - I just swam in one effort the total nbr of hours I put into swimming training in a month - so, it depends on every individual.
    You have gone already a long way with the cold adaption.

    Prepare for the worst and hope for the best. To be the best you can at one point and overcome your sport limits, this doesn't come free of pain.

    If it were me, I would carry ibuprofen - just in case, train my body as close to my personal limitations (physical and time available), and prepare my mind for cold, for pain and for the party at the end.

    Stop complaining, stop worrying, stop typing :)) - these are distractors, swim.

    Openh2omiklcctwendyv34MLambyflystorms
  • 100% right !
    Im in same situation!
    But listen my body!)))
    Will see!
    I just swim.but so many months party is problem now!
    BogdanZ u plan same ow?
    Or pool swim?))
    Be health and good luck to all

    LakeBagger
  • BogdanZBogdanZ Bucharest, RomaniaSenior Member

    @Openh2o said:
    BogdanZ u plan same ow?
    Or pool swim?))

    I train in the pool for the open water, out of lack of options. Sometimes I train in open water - lakes, or i reach the sea side. Usually I train for my major swim with a 3 weeks prior smaller ow marathon swim.
    And I try to have less party on Friday to Sunday.. they mess up the whole week.

    MLamby
  • miklcctmiklcct London, United KingdomMem​ber

    @BogdanZ said:

    I have seen some of your cold trainings on Facebook and I am pretty sure the cold, the speed are not your weakest points.

    I finally failed the swim due to missing the cap at a distance too far away that the shore runs away when the tide pulls me to the East, after a worse condition than the forecast in the initial 8-10 hours making me even slower than usual already-slow speed.

    I was told by the pilot that faster swimmers would make it. In fact they did, as the 3 CSA boats ahead of me in the latter stage all made it with me being the last of the 4 (a few abandoned early due to seasickness in rough condition).

    I was worried about getting the same fate as Stuart Handley because he was slow and chosen a neap tide, and it happened exactly on me even at the bottom of neap.

  • LaurieLaurie New Member
    edited April 2022

    I am training for a 12 mile swim in September and am currently using a training plan on swim smooth app. I am worried that long weekly swim is not long enough at this time. I am 23 weeks out and long swim is 3600 yards at this time. Can anyone tell me if this is accurate? The plan only allows me to see one week at a time so I can’t look at future weekly long swim distance.

    abbygirlrosemiklcct
  • abbygirlroseabbygirlrose Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CASenior Member

    @Laurie I am not familiar with that app, but i would be extremely nervous not knowing the full plan. What is your weekly yardage?

    JSwimmiklcct
  • LaurieLaurie New Member

    Right now it’s around 15,000 yards

  • abbygirlroseabbygirlrose Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CASenior Member

    I am not a swim coach (and I tend on the high side volume-wise), so I will defer to coaches but the rule of thumb I have heard is that you should aim for several weeks that average the yardage of your event.

  • LaurieLaurie New Member

    Thanks for the help! I’m new at this and it makes me nervous also that I cannot see the whole plan.

  • curlycurly Issaquah, WASenior Member
    edited April 2022

    @Laurie said:
    Thanks for the help! I’m new at this and it makes me nervous also that I cannot see the whole plan.

    Yes, I can understand your concern. In my way of thinking, a plan covers the whole period of activity. Getting one week of a workout is really just a plan for that week. It's certainly not a plan for a 12 mile swim 23 weeks from now. It's hard to understand the plan if you can't see the whole picture.

    Another way of stating the above rule of thumb is that you can swim in a day what you can swim in a week. Right now, your weekly yardage is pretty shy of a 12 mile swim. So I'd begin increasing your yardage for starters. Also, if I understand you correctly, you do a long swim of 3600 yards. While that is a perfectly good long swim, it is only around a fifth of the distance you plan to cover. So you probably want to make your long swims longer.

    Don't despair. You are off to a good start and you have plenty of time before September. But you should really start piling on some yardage now. If you are swimming 15K a week, that's ~5 x 3K for your daily swim. Next week you could easily blast out 3500 yard workouts and the following week, nudge it up to 4K per workout. And then you'd be at 20K for 5 workouts. Not too shabby.

    Of course, that would add a little more time to your workout and that might be a factor in your daily routine. And that's where planning starts to become more important. I had a job where I could only get in an actual 45 minute swim during lunch hour, so I could only do a 3K workout. But I got really good at changing and showering and driving back and forth from work in 7 minutes. ;) So there is always a way to do what you want to do.

    A lot of people on this site who live in real life have to do regular hour workouts during the week and then they get their long swims in on the weekend. If that's your case, then you could definitely increase your weekly yardage by doing two long swims on the weekend.

    Best of luck to you. It's a great challenge and you will encounter all sorts of roadblocks on the way. But you have come to a great site with a lot of very helpful people, so you will benefit from asking intelligent questions as you progress. There are plenty of people with tons of experience doing just what you are trying to accomplish and they love to share their experience. That's the whole point of this site. Hope this helps you in some way.

    evmoLakeBagger
  • LaurieLaurie New Member

    Thanks so much, that was exactly the info/ encouragement I needed to hear. I swim at 5 am and usually have 1-2 hours depending on my schedule so it’s will be feasible to add yardage during the week. I’ve found this is a great community with lots of experience to share!

    LakeBagger
  • miklcctmiklcct London, United KingdomMem​ber

    @curly said:
    A lot of people on this site who live in real life have to do regular hour workouts during the week and then they get their long swims in on the weekend. If that's your case, then you could definitely increase your weekly yardage by doing two long swims on the weekend.

    How about your other sports? My weekends are mainly taken by my other sport (orienteering), and I need sleep replenishment and rest days if I have a full time job so it's impractical for me to do 2 long swims on the weekend.

  • abbygirlroseabbygirlrose Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CASenior Member

    @miklcct we all make choices about how to balance our lives. It is impractical to expect to be able to train for it all, all at one.

    Cazzwim
  • j9swimj9swim CharlestonSenior Member

    @miklcct for most people there are no other sports when you comit to training and completing a marathon swim and we are happy with that. We love to swim and we manage to also have real jobs and families and friends.

    KatieBunCazzwim
  • miklcctmiklcct London, United KingdomMem​ber

    @j9swim said:
    @miklcct for most people there are no other sports when you comit to training and completing a marathon swim and we are happy with that. We love to swim and we manage to also have real jobs and families and friends.

    My expectation in marathon swimming is to get to a similar level in my other sport, which I have been in the national team. Therefore I'll only be happy if I can eventually come close to the national level (i.e. to get decent ranking in the national open water swimming championship).

    And I also want to have a real job and become a reputable professional in my field of expertise.

    Therefore I'm looking for inspiration from a marathon swimmer who are competitive, working as a professional, while being an elite sportsman in another sport.

  • abbygirlroseabbygirlrose Los Angeles and Palo Alto, CASenior Member

    @miklcct and have you been successful at finding any?

    j9swimKatieBunCazzwimamy_swims
  • curlycurly Issaquah, WASenior Member

    @miklcct said:

    @curly said:
    A lot of people on this site who live in real life have to do regular hour workouts during the week and then they get their long swims in on the weekend. If that's your case, then you could definitely increase your weekly yardage by doing two long swims on the weekend.

    How about your other sports? My weekends are mainly taken by my other sport (orienteering), and I need sleep replenishment and rest days if I have a full time job so it's impractical for me to do 2 long swims on the weekend.

    I'm afraid I have no other sports and I'm not a full time professional, so I really can't help you there.

    The only guy I can think of that checks all your boxes is DK Metcalf. He has a full time job as a professional. He is a great football player and apparently pretty darn competitive in track. But I think he would be considered an outlier.

    miklcct
  • LakeBaggerLakeBagger Central OregonSenior Member

    @Laurie ill just chime in to add: try to do some of your long swims in open water as it gets warmer. The first longer swim I did was just under 11 miles and I noticed my arms started to hurt near my inner elbow, around 5k in. It was a place they’d never hurt before. I did almost all my training in the pool and not having turns to change my body position every 25/50 meters really made me stiffen up. Same thing with the tops of my feet! Practicing in open water can really help with this, and also doing a few strokes of breastroke or backstroke here and there during the swim can help too. Congrats on your pursuit of this adventure!

    j9swimKatieBuncurlyabbygirlrose
  • CazzwimCazzwim UK.New Member

    @Laurie here is a link to another excellent thread on the subject.

    https://forum.marathonswimmers.org/discussion/1811/training-plans-for-marathon-swims-10k-and-up#latest

    Best of luck!

  • curlycurly Issaquah, WASenior Member

    @Cazzwim Thanks for the reminder of that thread. It is a good one. It also made me think of one tip that isn't dwelled upon enough. You need to train to understand what your body is telling you. When you have a written out plan for each day of the week, you don't get a chance to react to how you are performing. So you might be wounded from a serious workout the day before and maybe the best thing is to stretch it out and give yourself a break. That's pretty hard to do with a workout that is already written up in your monthly plan.

    I tend to go into a workout with a general idea of what I'm going to be trying to accomplish. Some days I completely surprise myself. Other days are just a slog. Take advantage of the feedback you are getting during your workout. Learn when you should kick your butt a little and when you should be nice to yourself. In most of our cases, not only are we the swimmer, but we are the coach as well.

    KatieBunCazzwim
  • LaurieLaurie New Member

    Thanks for all the great info. I have a background of Ironman distance triathlons and ultra running. I have learned to listen to my body over the years and plan my workouts accordingly, especially now that I’m older.

    JSwimcurlyCazzwimthelittlemerwookie
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