PowerBreather snorkel

IronMikeIronMike BostonCharter Member
edited February 2015 in General Discussion
Just saw this on my FB. I don't ever use snorkels, but I'm wondering what others think about this and what the benefits of using snorkels are.
http://www.powerbreather.com/en/

Just here troubling deaf heaven with my bootless cries...

Comments

  • NoelFigartNoelFigart Lebanon, NHSenior Member
    I suppose it could help with head and body position issues. (Isn't that the argument for a snorkel?) I do know that when I switch from breathing on every third stroke to every fifth, I speed up , so I am sure (in spite of what my coach is saying) that something is going on with my breathing that is slowing me down.

    I can just imagine trying that out and getting a lung full of water due to my standard swimming breathing habit, though.
  • dpm50dpm50 PA, U.S.Senior Member
    I couldn't open the link, but some general thoughts on snorkels--my coach is suggesting that I get one for the reasons Noel mentioned. I've always been reluctant--similar concerns to Noel's. I wonder what the learning curve is like on these things.
  • IronMikeIronMike BostonCharter Member
    But if you practice not turning your head when using the snorkel, then go to breathing like normal in a race, where's the benefit?

    Just here troubling deaf heaven with my bootless cries...

  • @dpm50 Re: learning curve on snorkels... THERE IS ONE. :) You'll have to learn a few things about breath control when using a snorkel, but I believe they are good lessons. All of this is from experience, but please fill me in if I missed things:
    1) The biggest one is that if you flipturn with a snorkel, the snorkel gets filled with water, so you have to clear it with air before you take your first breath out of the wall. Either use your tongue to plug your nose (bring your tongue to the upper back of your mouth and think about swallowing, and you'll see that you can block your nasal passage that way) or blow out less air out your nose, but don't blow out all your air. When you pop out, use the remaining air to clear your snorkel (which is now full of water) before you attempt to breathe again. Use a good *puff* out to blast out the water.
    2) It's actually hard to NOT turn your head, if you've been turning it for years. Even after resisting, you will still wobble your head a bit. And you will feel it any time your head is not aligned; when not facing straight on, a racing snorkel will produce drag and you'll feel the pull. In fact, I believe this is the biggest benefit of a snorkel, is for alignment of the body.
    3) Extending from that, if you come off the wall on a streamline with your head crooked, or turn your head weird on the flip turn, you'll notice this and be forced to correct it.
    4) Your breathing pattern should be the same as if you were still turning your head. If you breathe bilateral 3, then breathe in-out-out-in-out-out as if you were turning your head but weren't. If you feel like switching to every two, then just in-out-in-out like that. Your breath may fall into your pattern anyway, but don't let it get out of sync of your arms.
    5) Finally, you will from time to time get hit by a wave in the water that will cover the snorkel, and water will get in when you want to breathe. This is normal; do not panic. Either take a little extra quick breath out (say "two" really fast, and it should be staccato like that) and then breathe in. Or, you can just remove the snorkel and break stroke to get a breath, gather your thoughts, and put it back on. That's common when you start, don't be worried when it happens.
  • dpm50dpm50 PA, U.S.Senior Member
    Leadhyena wrote: »
    @dpm50 Re: learning curve on snorkels... THERE IS ONE. :) You'll have to learn a few things about breath control when using a snorkel, but I believe they are good lessons. All of this is from experience, but please fill me in if I missed things:
    1) The biggest one is that if you flipturn with a snorkel, the snorkel gets filled with water, so you have to clear it with air before you take your first breath out of the wall. Either use your tongue to plug your nose (bring your tongue to the upper back of your mouth and think about swallowing, and you'll see that you can block your nasal passage that way) or blow out less air out your nose, but don't blow out all your air. When you pop out, use the remaining air to clear your snorkel (which is now full of water) before you attempt to breathe again. Use a good *puff* out to blast out the water.
    2) It's actually hard to NOT turn your head, if you've been turning it for years. Even after resisting, you will still wobble your head a bit. And you will feel it any time your head is not aligned; when not facing straight on, a racing snorkel will produce drag and you'll feel the pull. In fact, I believe this is the biggest benefit of a snorkel, is for alignment of the body.
    3) Extending from that, if you come off the wall on a streamline with your head crooked, or turn your head weird on the flip turn, you'll notice this and be forced to correct it.
    4) Your breathing pattern should be the same as if you were still turning your head. If you breathe bilateral 3, then breathe in-out-out-in-out-out as if you were turning your head but weren't. If you feel like switching to every two, then just in-out-in-out like that. Your breath may fall into your pattern anyway, but don't let it get out of sync of your arms.
    5) Finally, you will from time to time get hit by a wave in the water that will cover the snorkel, and water will get in when you want to breathe. This is normal; do not panic. Either take a little extra quick breath out (say "two" really fast, and it should be staccato like that) and then breathe in. Or, you can just remove the snorkel and break stroke to get a breath, gather your thoughts, and put it back on. That's common when you start, don't be worried when it happens.

    Thanks for the tips! I'll keep these in mind if I decide to get a snorkel--I have the Finis alignment kickboard and realize this might be a tool better used with a snorkel b/c taking a breath tends to throw me off any kind of rhythm, so maybe paired with a snorkel, it would work better for me.
  • SydneDSydneD Senior Member
    I actually got a snorkel so that I could give myself feedback on my hand position during my catch and pull. I tend to be a right breather and I know that when I breathe, I tend to sweep my left hand out to the side and lose efficiency. I also have a funky left hand entry sometimes.
    I use the snorkel as a means of checking in with myself periodically. I might do a set of 10x50s during a workout where I focus exclusively on that left hand, and being able to see it is really helpful.
    Then, when I take the snorkel off, I have committed the correct feeling to my muscle memory.
    Since I can't always swim with my coaches--sigh--it's a great means of holding myself accountable.
    I do agree that there is a learning curve.
    I have an Arena set-up and like it quite a bit.
    IronMikesteffie
  • SpacemanspiffSpacemanspiff Dallas, TexasSenior Member
    NoelFigart wrote: »
    I suppose it could help with head and body position issues. (Isn't that the argument for a snorkel?) I do know that when I switch from breathing on every third stroke to every fifth, I speed up , so I am sure (in spite of what my coach is saying) that something is going on with my breathing that is slowing me down.

    IMHO, the fact that breathing slows you down does not necessarily mean there is something wrong with your breathing. Breathing slows you down, even if done correctly. That's why sprinters don't breathe.
    swimdaily

    "Lights go out and I can't be saved
    Tides that I tried to swim against
    Have brought be down upon my knees
    Oh I beg, I beg and plead..."

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